The Winnipeg event was one of more than 200 5G protests around the world on Saturday. Joe Scarpelli/Global News

Dozens of Winnipeggers took part in a global protest against 5G on Saturday.

While the Winnipeg event was more of an information session, Margaret Friesen, spokesperson for 5G Winnipeg awareness, said it’s important for people to know the risks of 5G small antennas.

“We’re looking at long-term effects which include cancer and neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis —you name it, it’s there,” Friesen said.

“We also have short-term concerns. There are people who have what’s called electrosensitivity and they can be affected on the short-term but with headaches, nausea, fatigue, sleep disturbances, heart abnormalities, confused thinking.

“It’s a very long list.”

Similar events and rallies were planned in 200 cities around the world, according to the website stop5ginternational.org.

“The issue is microwave radiation, which has been steadily intensifying for over two decades courtesy of the wireless revolution,” reads a media release on the website.

A spokesperson for the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (CWTA), however, told Global News the radio frequencies used by 5G have been used for years in applications like fixed wireless communications and satellite internet services.

“The potential health effects of RF energy from mobile communications have been studied for decades,” the spokesperson said.

“According to national and international governments and agencies, such as the World Health Organization, the American Cancer Society, and many others, there is no substantiated scientific evidence of harmful health effects from RF technologies used within national and international safety standards.”

Still, Friesen said more research still needs to be done.

“They’re ignoring a whole segment of science which needs to be taken into consideration to set appropriate standards and that should be done before there’s any rollout,” she said.

https://globalnews.ca/news/6462902/winnipeggers-global-5g-protests/

 


Local group sounds alarm over 5G cell towers

Glen Dawkins  Published:

Margaret Friesen is a local participant in Global 5G Protest Day, she is displaying various instruments. Saturday, January 25/2020 Winnipeg Sun/Chris Procaylo/stf

Margaret Friesen is the spokesperson and main presenter for the 5G Winnipeg Awareness group which held an information session at the Westminster Co-op Multi-Purpose Room in Wolseley on Saturday in connection with the Global 5G Protest Day.

 

Former Government of Canada research biologist Margaret Friesen is sounding the alarm over the possible harmful effects of 5G cell towers which could be popping up in neighbourhoods all over the city.

“What we need to do is put the brakes on, look at the literature, see where the knowledge gaps are, do some research and then figure out how we can do that,” said Friesen, the spokesperson and main presenter for the 5G Winnipeg Awareness group which held an information session at the Westminster Co-op Multi-Purpose Room in Wolseley on Saturday in connection with the Global 5G Protest Day.

“The vision for 5G by the industry is that by 2030 each of us will have nearly 60 wireless devices. We’re just going to be immersed in this huge soup of what looks to be a carcinogen. Then it will be a little late to do the science.”

Protests and awareness-raising events are being held in at least eight provinces and 18 cities across Canada and in hundreds of places worldwide, organizers said.

Organizers were asking Winnipeggers to add their voices and support the International Appeal to Stop 5G. The Appeal calls on the world’s governments to stop the deployment of 5G. The rollout of 5G requires hundreds of thousands of new network antennas that will be closer to homes than ever before.

“We’re looking at long-term effects which include cancer and neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis,” said Friesen, who developed electromagnetic sensitivity about 20 years ago. “You name it, it’s there. We’re concerned about the effects on children. Children absorb more of this kind of radiation than adults do.

“We also have short-term concerns. There are people who have what is called electrosensitivity and they can be affected in the short term with headaches, nausea, fatigue, sleep disturbances, heart abnormalities, (and) confused thinking. It’s a very long list.”

A crowd of around 30 people attended Saturday’s information session in Winnipeg.

“I came certainly to find out more about it,” said Blake Taylor, one of the attendees. “I’m wondering if there is science behind it. I’m not completely trusting that the government is going to protest us if there are health issues.”

Organizers were also collecting signatures on a petition calling on Mayor Brian Bowman and City Council to say “No” to the installation of 4G/5G cell antennas in residential areas until safety to human health is established.

“We drive cars and we know that they are not always safe,” said Friesen. “We know they have gas in the tank which is really not safe. But we have developed that to make it safer. We’ve done things to make things safer and that’s what we need to do with technology.”

The Appeal has been signed by people from over 200 countries and territories, including more than 7,000 scientists and medical doctors, more than 2,000 environmental organizations and 770 beekeepers. The Appeal will be delivered to officials in governments and international organizations, including the European Union, the United Nations and the World Health Organization. Brussels, Belgium, parts of Italy and Switzerland have put a pause on 5G deployment. Sutton, Que., unanimously passed a resolution to request the federal government have a moratorium on the deployment of the 5G cellular network, until the various studies reach a consensus on the absence of risk and impact of the technology on health and the environment.

gdawkins@postmedia.com

Twitter: @SunGlenDawkins


 

Community members take a second look at 5G

https://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1884967

 





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